Generally, when we speak of universally well-loved films, there are two reasons for them to be so broadly recognized: either a groundbreaking new style or idea - or an old one, but done in a way that it tends to characterize generations: the original Star Wars is a good example. But, to people that have had their childhood in the early 2000’s, there is perhaps no film series more dear than Harry Potter. We have grown up as Harry, Ron and Hermione have, had our childhood lives grown more cynical and perhaps darker as we grew towards adulthood and thus it is only fitting that these films have had the success they have had. The iconic Hogwarts Express, in the upper picture, is an instantly recognisable scene, a feat for any movie. The more pained picture, certain to evoke emotions in some, is, however, cinematographicly better - I’d go as far as to say that it is absolutely beautiful and near perfection. Moreover, the whole aesthetic of the 6th movie is very well done - and what can only seldom, sadly, be seen in movies, extremely emotional. Yes, the techniques aren’t groundbreaking or wonder far off the beaten path, but high production values and a solid story can surely result in something that leaves a permanent emotional mark. And that is, afterall, why people watch and make movies.
Harry Potter - The Half-blood Prince (2009)
Directed by David Yates, cinematography by Bruno Delbonnel
Generally, when we speak of universally well-loved films, there are two reasons for them to be so broadly recognized: either a groundbreaking new style or idea - or an old one, but done in a way that it tends to characterize generations: the original Star Wars is a good example. But, to people that have had their childhood in the early 2000’s, there is perhaps no film series more dear than Harry Potter. We have grown up as Harry, Ron and Hermione have, had our childhood lives grown more cynical and perhaps darker as we grew towards adulthood and thus it is only fitting that these films have had the success they have had. The iconic Hogwarts Express, in the upper picture, is an instantly recognisable scene, a feat for any movie. The more pained picture, certain to evoke emotions in some, is, however, cinematographicly better - I’d go as far as to say that it is absolutely beautiful and near perfection. Moreover, the whole aesthetic of the 6th movie is very well done - and what can only seldom, sadly, be seen in movies, extremely emotional. Yes, the techniques aren’t groundbreaking or wonder far off the beaten path, but high production values and a solid story can surely result in something that leaves a permanent emotional mark. And that is, afterall, why people watch and make movies.
Harry Potter - The Half-blood Prince (2009)
Directed by David Yates, cinematography by Bruno Delbonnel

Generally, when we speak of universally well-loved films, there are two reasons for them to be so broadly recognized: either a groundbreaking new style or idea - or an old one, but done in a way that it tends to characterize generations: the original Star Wars is a good example. But, to people that have had their childhood in the early 2000’s, there is perhaps no film series more dear than Harry Potter. We have grown up as Harry, Ron and Hermione have, had our childhood lives grown more cynical and perhaps darker as we grew towards adulthood and thus it is only fitting that these films have had the success they have had. The iconic Hogwarts Express, in the upper picture, is an instantly recognisable scene, a feat for any movie. The more pained picture, certain to evoke emotions in some, is, however, cinematographicly better - I’d go as far as to say that it is absolutely beautiful and near perfection. Moreover, the whole aesthetic of the 6th movie is very well done - and what can only seldom, sadly, be seen in movies, extremely emotional. Yes, the techniques aren’t groundbreaking or wonder far off the beaten path, but high production values and a solid story can surely result in something that leaves a permanent emotional mark. And that is, afterall, why people watch and make movies.


Harry Potter - The Half-blood Prince (2009)

Directed by David Yates, cinematography by Bruno Delbonnel

There’s no doubt that Robert Evans is one of the greats in producing. Having shocked everyone with the three-hour-epic crime saga The Godfather, he went on to produce one of the all-time thriller greats: Chinatown. In addition to the well-constructed script, the cinematography is intresting neo-noir, as is the script, and to me works very well. The feeling is kept up throughout, and especially the lighting has succeeded very well. Overall, a good, solid performance, but still subtle enough not to distract. Sometimes, though, cinematography needs to distract.
Chinatown (1974)
Directed by Roman Polanski, cinematography by John A. Alonzo
There’s no doubt that Robert Evans is one of the greats in producing. Having shocked everyone with the three-hour-epic crime saga The Godfather, he went on to produce one of the all-time thriller greats: Chinatown. In addition to the well-constructed script, the cinematography is intresting neo-noir, as is the script, and to me works very well. The feeling is kept up throughout, and especially the lighting has succeeded very well. Overall, a good, solid performance, but still subtle enough not to distract. Sometimes, though, cinematography needs to distract.
Chinatown (1974)
Directed by Roman Polanski, cinematography by John A. Alonzo

There’s no doubt that Robert Evans is one of the greats in producing. Having shocked everyone with the three-hour-epic crime saga The Godfather, he went on to produce one of the all-time thriller greats: Chinatown. In addition to the well-constructed script, the cinematography is intresting neo-noir, as is the script, and to me works very well. The feeling is kept up throughout, and especially the lighting has succeeded very well. Overall, a good, solid performance, but still subtle enough not to distract. Sometimes, though, cinematography needs to distract.


Chinatown (1974)

Directed by Roman Polanski, cinematography by John A. Alonzo

Recently, I have been completely captivated by the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. In 1957 he released two incredibly good, stunning, pieces - The Seventh Seal and this, Smultronstället or Wild Strawberries. While having just two stills makes no justice to the original films whatsoever, I picked the two pictures out of a single sequence for this. The first one is, to me, about a brilliant detail - while it might be hard to see from the picture, there is actually a lamp in the cradle, luminating the actors’ face as he walks to stand before it. Creating subtle attention to it that way is very very handy, and a technique essential for a good cinematographer. The second is also about creating attention - the actor is in the middle of the picture, and the “circular bokeh” caused by some older midlenght lenses is put to extremely good use. It works to squeeze the image in just the right way, push the face from the image and creating a dream-like feeling to a dream scene. Though not subtle, it works marvelously.
Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries)
Directed by Ingmar Bergman, cinematography by Gunnar Fischer
Recently, I have been completely captivated by the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. In 1957 he released two incredibly good, stunning, pieces - The Seventh Seal and this, Smultronstället or Wild Strawberries. While having just two stills makes no justice to the original films whatsoever, I picked the two pictures out of a single sequence for this. The first one is, to me, about a brilliant detail - while it might be hard to see from the picture, there is actually a lamp in the cradle, luminating the actors’ face as he walks to stand before it. Creating subtle attention to it that way is very very handy, and a technique essential for a good cinematographer. The second is also about creating attention - the actor is in the middle of the picture, and the “circular bokeh” caused by some older midlenght lenses is put to extremely good use. It works to squeeze the image in just the right way, push the face from the image and creating a dream-like feeling to a dream scene. Though not subtle, it works marvelously.
Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries)
Directed by Ingmar Bergman, cinematography by Gunnar Fischer

Recently, I have been completely captivated by the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. In 1957 he released two incredibly good, stunning, pieces - The Seventh Seal and this, Smultronstället or Wild Strawberries. While having just two stills makes no justice to the original films whatsoever, I picked the two pictures out of a single sequence for this. The first one is, to me, about a brilliant detail - while it might be hard to see from the picture, there is actually a lamp in the cradle, luminating the actors’ face as he walks to stand before it. Creating subtle attention to it that way is very very handy, and a technique essential for a good cinematographer. The second is also about creating attention - the actor is in the middle of the picture, and the “circular bokeh” caused by some older midlenght lenses is put to extremely good use. It works to squeeze the image in just the right way, push the face from the image and creating a dream-like feeling to a dream scene. Though not subtle, it works marvelously.

Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries)

Directed by Ingmar Bergman, cinematography by Gunnar Fischer

Going to a completely different world now - although themes do have a tiny bit of overlap, it’s Spring Breakers, Sofia Coppola’s newest. Although the movie was at least partly trash (even if that was the point) the cinematography is very well done. It is more reminiscent to movies like Blade Runner than teen comedies, which it by at least classification is. Coloured light is key here: scenes are defined by their colour. The first still is in a club, murky, green, drug-hazed world that the stories’ girls are falling into, and the second is the “life”: playing a grand piano in the pink sunset by both the pool and the sea. Very good use of colourtheory here - but the composition is unfortunately a bit inane.
Spring Breakers (2012)
Directed by Sofia Coppola, cinematography by Benoît Debie
Going to a completely different world now - although themes do have a tiny bit of overlap, it’s Spring Breakers, Sofia Coppola’s newest. Although the movie was at least partly trash (even if that was the point) the cinematography is very well done. It is more reminiscent to movies like Blade Runner than teen comedies, which it by at least classification is. Coloured light is key here: scenes are defined by their colour. The first still is in a club, murky, green, drug-hazed world that the stories’ girls are falling into, and the second is the “life”: playing a grand piano in the pink sunset by both the pool and the sea. Very good use of colourtheory here - but the composition is unfortunately a bit inane.
Spring Breakers (2012)
Directed by Sofia Coppola, cinematography by Benoît Debie

Going to a completely different world now - although themes do have a tiny bit of overlap, it’s Spring Breakers, Sofia Coppola’s newest. Although the movie was at least partly trash (even if that was the point) the cinematography is very well done. It is more reminiscent to movies like Blade Runner than teen comedies, which it by at least classification is. Coloured light is key here: scenes are defined by their colour. The first still is in a club, murky, green, drug-hazed world that the stories’ girls are falling into, and the second is the “life”: playing a grand piano in the pink sunset by both the pool and the sea. Very good use of colourtheory here - but the composition is unfortunately a bit inane.


Spring Breakers (2012)

Directed by Sofia Coppola, cinematography by Benoît Debie

Going to use this Tumblr to post some of my cinematographic discoveries - both in b/w and colour, but all with timeless style and finesse. No “Life of Pi” here!
These stills are from Federico Fellini’s semi-self-biographic movie 8 1/2, and they have an extremely intelligent use of light in a night sequence, something seldom found in movies. The light, being cast from up and from behind the camera to light actors’ and actresses’ faces, works really quite beautifully - in addition to Italian 60’s flair.
8 1/2 (1963)
Directed by Federico Fellini, Cinematography by Gianni Di Venanzo
Going to use this Tumblr to post some of my cinematographic discoveries - both in b/w and colour, but all with timeless style and finesse. No “Life of Pi” here!
These stills are from Federico Fellini’s semi-self-biographic movie 8 1/2, and they have an extremely intelligent use of light in a night sequence, something seldom found in movies. The light, being cast from up and from behind the camera to light actors’ and actresses’ faces, works really quite beautifully - in addition to Italian 60’s flair.
8 1/2 (1963)
Directed by Federico Fellini, Cinematography by Gianni Di Venanzo

Going to use this Tumblr to post some of my cinematographic discoveries - both in b/w and colour, but all with timeless style and finesse. No “Life of Pi” here!


These stills are from Federico Fellini’s semi-self-biographic movie 8 1/2, and they have an extremely intelligent use of light in a night sequence, something seldom found in movies. The light, being cast from up and from behind the camera to light actors’ and actresses’ faces, works really quite beautifully - in addition to Italian 60’s flair.


8 1/2 (1963)

Directed by Federico Fellini, Cinematography by Gianni Di Venanzo

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

you were amazing today! have you thought about becoming a teacher or something?

well thank you very much and not at all I would be the absolutely worst teacher ever.

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